Mexico City’s prison system has started letting gay inmates receive conjugal visits, a human rights group announced yesterday.

City authorities accepted a recommendation made by the Mexican National Human Rights Commission, agreeing that the visits would help end discrimination.

“The Mexico City department of prisons and rehabilitation has allowed the first conjugal visit to an inmate with a sexual orientation other than heterosexual,” the commission said in a statement, according to the BBC.

“It is an important step in terms of non-discrimination regarding sexual preference.”

The move came after a male prisoner filed a complaint.

The commission ruled that not allowing the inmate a conjugal visit from his partner was discrimination.

Prisoners are allowed conjugal visits in many Mexican jails, and most do not require the visitor to be married to the inmate.

Discrimination based on sexual orientation in Mexico was outlawed in 2003.

Last year, Mexico City’s centre-left government backed same-sex civil unions.

The new law granted pensions, property and inheritance rights to gay couples, but will not extend to adoption.