The Prime Minister of Poland has rejected the European Parliament’s censure of his government’s homophobia.

Jaroslaw Kaczynski said that gay people did not face discrimination in Poland, but reiterated his view that homosexuality is bad for society.

For the first time Mr Kaczynski has spoken in favour of repressive new laws that would affect schools.

“Nobody is limiting gay rights in Poland,” Mr Kaczynski said.

“However, if we’re talking about not having homosexual propaganda in Polish schools, I fully agree with those who feel this way.

“Such propaganda should not be in schools; it definitely doesn’t serve youth well.

“It’s not in the interests of any society to increase the number of homosexuals, that’s obvious.”

The plans to ban discussions on homosexuality in schools and educational institutions came from Poland’s education minister Roman Giertych, the leader of the League of Polish Families party.

They are junior members of Mr Kaczynski’s coalition government.

Education minister Miroslaw Orzechowski previously announced that new laws will, “punish whomever promotes homosexuality or any other deviance of a sexual nature in educational establishments.”

Under their proposals teachers could be fired, fined or imprisoned if they violate the rules and openly gay teachers could lose their jobs.

On Wednesday the European Parliament called for a fact-finding mission to Poland in light of the proposed homophobic measures in schools.

Mr Giertych recently caused outrage at a meeting of EU education ministers when he openly criticised so-called “homosexual propaganda” in schools and suggested a EU-wide ban.

Mr Kaczynski’s comments on homosexuality echo those of his twin brother Lech, who is President of Poland.

During a recent trip to Ireland, President Kaczynski said that the promotion of homosexuality would lead to the eventual destruction of humanity.

“If that kind of approach to sexual life were to be promoted on a grand scale, the human race would disappear.

“Imagine what grand changes would occur in mores if the traditional links between men and women were set aside.”

Politicians across the political spectrum in Ireland lined up to pour scorn on the Pole’s comments.