The Union of Students in Ireland (USI) has expressed disappointment at the High Court in Dublin’s rejection of a bid by two women to have their marriage in Canada upheld under Irish law.

Earlier today, Ms Justice Elizabeth Dunne dismissed the case of Katherine Zappone and Ann Louise Gilligan claiming that marriage could only be defined between members of the opposite sex.

The USI’s gay and lesbian spokesperson Steve Conlon described the judgement as “questionable.”

He said: “it is clearly untenable to interpret the 1937 Constitution in a way that fails to read into its provisions a safeguarding of fundamental human rights.”

USI President Colm Hamrogue said: “The 1937 Constitution is a living document, in the sense that it should be interpreted in line with the evolving standards and expectations of a civilised society. The Constitution should buttress, not undermine, civil equality.

“USI will continue to support efforts by Drs Zappone and Gilligan – and thousands of other citizens – to win acknowledgement in Ireland of their human rights to enter into civil marriage on an equal footing.”

It is a similar ruling to that of Celia Kitzinger and Sue Wilkinson who were told by the High Court in London that their Canadian marriage could not be recognised in the UK.

Last month, Israel’s High Court of Justice this morning ruled that gay couples legally wedded abroad can be registered as married in the population registry.