Supporters of the Scotland international team may face prosecution for homophobic chanting, according to reports.

Tartan Army fans are the subject of a police investigation after complaints of anti-gay abuse being sung by fans, including one chant questioning the sexuality of English football pundit Jimmy Hill.

Spectators could be banned from grounds under anti-bigotry laws, The Scotsman reports.

South of the border, English football clubs have acted against homophobic chanting with some fans being thrown out of grounds and in some cases charged.

Last September, Brighton and Hove Albion responded to the problem by launching it’s own awareness campaign via an article in a match programme. Entitled ‘Homophobia – Time for Action’, the article includes a statement of commitment to Football Association (FA) efforts to combat homophobia.

An extract from the team’s match day programme reads: “We fully support the Football Association’s initiative on homophobia, which aims to promote a tolerant footballing society and to make the spectator experience as exciting and all-embracing as possible.”

Last month, James Monkhouse and Michael Church, Norwich City fans, were found guilty by Norwich Magistrates’ Court of disorderly behaviour after reportedly shouting anti-gay chants aimed at Brighton football club fans earlier this year.

Earlier this year the Football Association outlined its opposition to homophobia in the game, the FA’s director of corporate affairs, Simon Johnson, told PinkNews.co.uk: “The FA is leading the way on tackling homophobia in football and our work is becoming recognised across Europe. We underline our opposition to homophobia in our football for all strategy along with race and disability discrimination.

“Abuse of any such nature can now be tackled by the FA via sanctions and potential bans.”

Other football clubs such as Manchester United, Manchester City and Coventry City have also previously stated their commitment to the FA’s efforts to tackle homophobia in football.